Dining

Chef’s recipes, gourmet restaurants, exotic flavours, even street food

Famous food from chefs at Phuket’s best restaurants

in Dining by

While the Thai capital of Bangkok is a globally recognised dining destination that’s on the verge of getting its own Michelin star guide, Phuket is no slouch when it comes to delicious and daring food either. The island’s rich culinary heritage can be traced back to the diverse tastes that flourished from the waves of migrant arrivals from across Asia in days past to its current status as one of the top resort islands in Asia.

Some truly talented chefs from Thailand and around the world have added their own creative flavours, colour and panache to the Phuket dining scene. Be sure to try some of these standout dishes at Phuket’s best restaurants if you haven’t already!

Bampot Kitchen & Bar

The idea behind every dish and drink at Bampot is to take local ingredients and apply the best technique for each ingredient, whether Thai or Western style, and pair complementing flavours and textures to end up with a balanced finished dish.

It’s all about great food and drinks in a relaxed atmosphere

Chef Jamie Wakeford

Bampot is Scottish Chef Jamie’s first solo venture following a career in top kitchens in the UK and Asia.

TRY:

  • Prawn bon bon, screen curry foam
  • Duck, pistachio, pickled local jubjube
  • Crab tagliatelle, yellow curry, basil

COCKTAILS?

The Tamarind and Cardamom Smash with Chalong Bay rum, tamarind, cardamom and lime reflects Bampot’s whimsical approach.

With its meticulously presented dishes and unpretentious style, Bampot has become a foodie favourite since it opened near Bang Tao Beach.

Suay Restaurant

Stepping into Suay restaurant in Phuket Town is like entering the home of a friend, with its low-key and welcoming style providing a subtle backdrop to the sensational fusion food that’s about to be served.

Created by Chef Tammasak Chootong, known by many as Chef Noi, Suay means “beautiful” in Thai and his dishes have earned him renown not only for beautiful presentation but for his bold and sassy balance of flavours.

SIGNATURE DISHES:

  • Crab curry quiche Lorraine (where he adds a bit of Thai zest to the timeless comfort dish)
  • Bite-sized Foie gras with tamarind and lemongrass dressing,

Keep Reading

10 Vegan Restaurants in Canggu, Bali

in Dining by
Canggu Bali Vegan Food

A growing number of Bali restaurants are catering to tourists who are partial to plant-based diets and in pursuit of a healthy, sustainable lifestyle. Yes, even whilst on holiday. Their menus are laden with Asian-fusion vegan/vegetarian dishes combining fresh local produce with the aromatic flavour profiles famous around Southeast Asia, as well as vegan renditions of well-known western meals. 

For a large selection of vegan-friendly and exclusively vegan restaurants in Bali, visit the trendy laid back surf town of Canggu on the island’s west coast (or go to yogi haven Ubud, but that’s a different list of restaurants for another day).

To all the vegans, vegetarians, health nuts, locavores and omnivores (OK that’s everyone), feast your eyes on our guide to Canggu’s best restaurants with good vegan food. Maybe you’ll find a new favourite food spot.

 

Peloton vegan cafe Canggu

1

Peloton Supershop
VEGAN CAFÉ FOR BREAKFAST AND LUNCH

Vintage bicycles meet vegan food on the corner of Jl. Pantai Berawa. The friendly, creative atmosphere and irresistible menu at Peloton Supershop welcome you for a scrumptious breakfast or lunch. Their burgers with a charcoal or spirulina bun, and large hearty vegan salads fuel you up with goodness. Nourishing superfood shots and coffees with coconut, almond or soy milk make a perfect accompaniment.

Peloton Supershop
Jl. Pantai Berawa No.46
www.pelotonsupershop.com

The Shady Shack Canggu restaurant

2

Shady Shack
RICE FIELDS FOREVER

Overlooking the rice fields on Jl. Tanak Barah, this popular Canggu vegetarian restaurant serves up delicious vegan and gluten-free dishes that won’t leave you hungry or disappointed. Their menu consists of bowls, burgers and wraps that delight from breakfast to dinner. This cute hideaway’s garden décor makes it a great place to grab a coffee and a piece of cake with in a beautiful setting anytime.

Shady Shack
Jl. Tanah Barak No.57
www.facebook.com/Theshadyshackbali

Pad Thai at Green Ginger Bali

3

Green Ginger Noodle House
VEGETARIAN ASIAN FOOD

Delivering a range of exotic flavours, Green Ginger Noodle House is a vegetarian restaurant which also boasts an excellent variety of vegan dishes, including Vietnamese Pho Chay and the tastiest Pad Thai in town.

Keep Reading

Food Guide: Sri Lankan Cuisine

in Dining by

Sri Lankan cuisine isn’t particularly well known on the international stage. Although it is often misunderstood or taken to be an extension of Indian food, it is a very unique cuisine. For many who do visit Sri Lanka it’s love at first taste!

Sri Lankan cuisine consists mainly of fragrant curries and starchy accompaniments, which include hoppers (crispy bowl-shaped fermented rice flour pancakes), string hoppers (steamed rice flour vermicelli ‘nests’) and rotis (flatbreads). A cross between Thai and Indian cuisine, traditional Sri Lankan curries are cooked using a fresh spice paste, comprising ginger, garlic, fresh chilli and sun dried spices, with flavours influenced by region and the cook’s ethnicity.

Almost any fruit or vegetable can be used to make a curry or an accompanying dish such as a sambol (usually hot and fiery), mallung (shredded greens), or chutney, and a typical meal includes a meat or fish dish, a few vegetable dishes and a lentil curry (dhal). Coconut milk is used in some curries to add creaminess while others are left ‘dry’, and the result is a really healthy balanced cuisine.

Sri Lankan currySRI LANKAN CURRY FROM jamieoliver.com

Rice and curry is typically eaten for lunch whereas hoppers and string hoppers are often on breakfast and dinner menus, usually served with a fish and/or dhal curry, a fiery kata sambol (tomato, onion and dried chilli) or a sweet onion relish. Sri Lankans aren’t big on desserts, and usually end a meal with fresh tropical fruit, ice cream or an adopted Malay crème caramel-like dish, watalappan.

Sri Lankan New Year takes place in April, and this is a time of celebration for the island’s Buddhists and Hindus who prepare special sweets and sweetmeats for sharing. Thanks to the island’s Muslims, biryani is another popular ‘borrowed’ dish as is fried rice or fried noodles, a favourite quasi-Chinese dish adapted by the Sri Lankans that you’ll see in many guises on numerous restaurant menus.

You’ll be able to try an endless number of delicious Sri Lankan curries when you book a stay at one of our villas in Sri Lanka. The villas come with a full complement of staff, including a chef or a cook, and they can introduce you to the flavours of Sri Lankan cuisine. They will also be happy to teach you how to make your favourite dishes for recreating with your friends and family back home.

Keep Reading

Two Four Six Ate

in Dining by
Al Diwan Seminyak Restaurant

Here in Bali we like to layer up the recommendations to try Balinese food and Indonesian food, especially our chef’s special recipes, but Bali is a foodie’s paradise with international chefs plating dishes with flavours from all corners of the globe.

Did you know you can find sensational seafood, authentic Mediterranean cuisine and extraordinary Middle Eastern food in central beachside Seminyak? That’s exactly how Linda Lim handled three nights out with friends:

DINNER FOR TWO: Urchin

Urchin Bar and Restaurant is relatively new to Seminyak’s seafood scene. We let restaurant manager Ramon Meijer choose our dishes for the evening (and didn’t regret it one bit).

Tartare at Urchin Seminyak restaurant

IMAGE: COURTESTY OF URCHIN

STARTERS: Having worked up quite an appetite while browsing at the amazing Kim Soo homewares store next door, the bread basket hit the spot; thick slices of warm bread with butter and a dusting of seaweed powder. The real starter was tuna tartare, fresh raw cubed tuna coated with lime juice and wasabi and stuffed into a crispy cone made from wonton wrapper.

FIRST MAIN: Homemade sea urchin fettuccine with juicy prawns, clams, garnished with crispy fried seaweed ‘balls’ and a dollop of caviar. I twirled the fettuccine ribbons with my fork and popped the crunchy seaweed ‘ball’ into my mouth. Delicious. To finish, I mopped up the remaining sauce with a slice of bread (it seemed sinful to waste all that delicious sauce).

Sea bass at Urchin restaurant Seminyak

IMAGE: COURTESTY OF URCHIN

SECOND MAIN: Sea bass with grilled octopus, ink sauce, lemon coulis and (more) crunchy seaweed ‘balls’. This fish was cooked to perfection, crispy on the outside and flaky on the inside. Each bite-sized piece gets topped with a pat of lemon coulis and ink sauce. What a combo, you need to taste it to believe it.

DESSERT: A pleasant creamy nougat glacé, half-blanketed with an almond-crusted orange coulis. Light and refreshing, it was the perfect way to end the night.

GUESS I’LL BE BACK FOR LUNCH: According to Ramon, Felix Da Housecat is a fan of the Urchin lunch special – crispy pork belly with tzatziki, pickled cucumber and apple salad in a tortilla wrap.

Urchin
Jalan Laksmana 22,

Keep Reading

The Bali Culinary Collective

in Dining by

Bali’s is Southeast Asia’s enfant terrible of the culinary scene, with destination dining luring fabulous chefs from across the globe to cook up a monsoon on the island.

Top chefs such as New York’s dessert genius Will Goldfarb, Melbourne’s Frank Camorra and Geoff Lindsay, Caribbean-born London-raised Miles Belfield and Singapore-based-UK-born Ryan Clift are flocking to Bali. They join long-time giants of the culinary scene; Franco-American Chris Salans and Englishman James Efraim of Mozaic, Australian Will Meyrick and French dining trailblazers Nicholas ‘Dou Dou’ Tourneville and Said Alem who created Warisan and then Metis.

A visit to Bali demands that dwellers of exquisite villas drag themselves away from the delights of a private chef for a night or two of culinary exploration.

Prepare to be impressed.

Foremost in the savoury fray is the internationally renowned team at Ku De Ta, lead by executive chef Ben Cross. KDT’s fine dining restaurant, Mejekawi, is the host venue for The Culinary Collective Supper Club, a high cuisine extravaganza where imported talent collaborates with Chef Ben and KDT’s head chef Stephen Moore to create rare delights.

Recently, the award-winning chef Blaine Wetzel of The Willows Inn in Seattle – which is widely considered to be one of the best restaurants in the USA – produced a series of outstanding dishes that merged American traditions and style with Balinese ingredients to great success. Five hours of fine food and matched wine was a singular sensation. Think lushly juicy whole barramundi and crispy suckling pig cooked over coffee wood and paired with an Italian Marchesi de Frescobaldi Niozzano Riserva.

Serious foodie travellers and expat gourmands are the staple supporters of this supper club where networks are grown and friendships forged over a feast of fun and familiarity.

The next Culinary Collective is slated for March 9, when Chef Monty Koludrovic from Sydney’s legendary Icebergs will be in town. Chef Monty’s early cooking influence came from his Russian Nona and her traditional feasts, and was later refined at important kitchens throughout Europe.

On May 4, Executive Chef Federico Zanellato of Sydney’s award-winning fine diner LuMi will hit the pans, followed by the amazing barbeque king

Dave Pynt, of Burnt Ends in Singapore, on June 24. In September Hong Kong’s Matt Abergele from Yard Bird will headline, while October will feature the many talents of Chef James Lowe of Lyles,

Keep Reading

1 2 3 6
Go to Top